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Fall 2014

 

SPCL research featured in the news!

Professor Richeson's opinion piece, "What Ivy League ties to slavery teach about redemption" was featured in The Boston Globe. The piece describes lab research on redemption narratives, the process of reflecting on and deriving positive meaning from past negative events. This research, led by SPCL alumna Katie Rotella is forthcoming in the journal Group Processes and Intergroup Relations (GPIR). Other work by Professor Richeson and Katie Rotella was featured on NPR; this research explores people's memory for negative intergroup events.

 

 

The SPCL welcomes new lab members!

The SPCL would like to welcome first-year graduate students Natalie Daumeyer and Julian Rucker! Before joining the SPCL, Natalie completed her undergraduate work at Miami University. Julian, who attended UT Austin as an undergraduate, spent the past year working as a lab manager at Indiana University. We would also like to welcome back former lab member Michelle Rheinschmidt Same as a postdoctoral fellow and lab manager. Michelle recently completed her Ph.D. at UC Berkeley. We look forward to working with Natalie, Julian, and Michelle!

 

 

 

 

 

Foley begins Master's program

Former lab manager, Lauren Foley, will attend the MGH Institute of Health Professions beginning this fall. She will pursue a Master of Science in Nursing to become a nurse practitioner. We thank Lauren for her hard work in the SPCL and wish her the best in her program!

 

 

 

 

Spring 2014

 

Hina wins 2nd place at URAG Poster Session!

Hina presented the work from her thesis "Walking the Walk: Discrimination of Muslim-Americans and Racial/Ethnic Minorities and its Impact on Coping and Collective Action" at the 2014 Undergraduate Research and Arts Exposition and her poster won second place! Here, she is pictured with advisor, Dr. Jennifer Richeson, and graduate student mentor, Dorainne Levy.

 

 

 

Introducing, Dr. Maureen A. Craig!

Maureen Craig successfully defended her dissertation! After commencement, she will begin a postdoctoral fellowship in the Department of Psychology at the Ohio State University! She will join the labs of Drs. Kentaro Fujita and Lisa Libby.  In the postdoc, she will develop new collaborations that explore how construal level may influence intra-minority intergroup relations and how subjective perceptions of the "majority-minority" racial shift may influence perceived threat and related outcomes.

 

 

Alissa wins a grant from the DRRC!

 

Alissa Mrazek, a third year doctoral student in the SPCL, was awarded a research grant from the Dispute Resolution Research Center (DRRC) at NU's Kellogg School of Management. Alissa will use the grant to fund continuing research investigating how motivational orientations interact with genetic variation to influence cooperation with minorities.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Winter 2014

 

Craig's research highlighted!

Maureen Craig's research on the effects of shifting racial demographics on White Americans' racial attitudes and political ideology is getting all sorts of media coverage! The paper on political ideology has been mentioned in the Huffington Post, by J. Bouie in Slate, by J. Chait in New York Magazine, as well as on Minnesota Public Radio News and All in with Chris Hays. Her work on racial attitudes has been covered in Pacific Standard.

 

Summer 2013

 

 

SROP student Jasmine Koech from West Virginia University (bottom right) with Professor Richeson and Dorainne Levy at her research presentation session.

Spring 2013

 

Laura Venn completes her Undergraduate Thesis

 

SPCL Research Assistant, Laura Venn, presents a poster on her thesis research. 

 

Congrats, Laura on your work and best of luck at Wash U!

 

Winter 2013

Professor Richeson is named John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Chair!

 

Professor Richeson is named the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Chair in an Investiture Ceremony at Northwestern. She is pictured here with her brother and parents in front of a personally engraved ice sculpture!

 

 

 

Fall 2012

The SPCL welcomes our new lab manager!

The Social Perception and Communication Lab warmly welcomes Lauren Foley to our research team!  Lauren comes to us from UMass Amherst.  She worked as a research assistant for the Peace & Violence Program.  We look forward to working with Lauren!

 

Spring 2012

 

Professor Richeson appears on the Melissa Harris-Perry Show

Professor Richeson discusses how the brain instinctively weighs decisions and forms political beliefs on the Melissa Harris-Perry Show on MSNBC. You can see clip of the conversation with Professor Richeson, Dr. Jonathan Metzl, and Melissa Harris-Perry by clicking here.

 

Peery accepts VAP position at Duke Law School

 

Destiny Peery has accepted a Visiting Assistant Professor (VAP) position at Duke Law School.  This is a two-year position designed to support and mentor aspiring faculty. The VAP program selects only two individuals per year who demonstrate potential to obtain a tenure-track position at a top-tier institution.

 

Levy awarded NSF fellowship and a Ford Foundation fellowship

Dorainne Levy, a second year doctoral student in the SPCL, was awarded a 2012 National Science Foundation (NSF) Graduate Research Fellowship.  The NSF selects graduate students based on outstanding abilities and past accomplishments, as well as potential to contribute to strengthening research in STEM fields.  Dorainne will use this award to further her current research on the affective, cognitive, behavioral, and health outcomes of contending with discrimination.

The Ford Foundation selects graduate students based on their scholarly competence as well as their potential for future achievement as a scholar, researcher, and teacher in an institution of higher education.  This award is meant to increase the number of professors who can and will use diversity as a resource for enriching the education of all students.

 

 

 

 

Winter 2012

Craig's TESS proposal is accepted to be fielded

Maureen Craig's research proposal for the Time-sharing Experiments for the Social Sciences (TESS) program, titled "Is the Impending 'Majority-Minority' United States Seen as a System Threat to White Americans?", has been accepted to be fielded.  The TESS program, funded by NSF, fields social science experiments for investigators and pays for the cost to collect data from nationally-representative samples.

 

 

Fall 2011

Levy wins SPSP diversity travel award

Dorainne Levy, a second year doctoral student in the SPCL, has received the Society for Personality and Social Psychology (SPSP) Diversity Travel Award.  The SPSP created this fund to increase diversity within personality and social psychology and award recipients are chosen on the basis of intellectual merit.  Dorainne will receive $500 to support her travel to attend the SPSP annual conference in San Diego, CA, which will be held January 26-28, 2012.

 

 

Spring 2011

Bean defends dissertation and accepts post-doctoral position

Meghan Bean has defended her dissertation and begun a post-doctoral position at the University of Arizona!  Good luck, Meghan!

 

Apfelbaum begins faculty position at MIT

Evan Apfelbaum has accepted a tenure-track faculty position in Organization Studies at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Sloan School of Management!

Craig to attend SIPP

Maureen Craig has been accepted to attend the Summer Institute in Political Psychology, a three-week intensive training program focused on political psychology.

Espy decides on U of M

Dawn Espy has decided to pursue her doctoral studies in the Personality and Social Contexts program at the University of Michigan.  She will be advised by Robert Sellers.

Rotella wins grant to attend fMRI training course

Katie Rotella has won a grant to attend the 2011 Training Course in fMRI at the University of Michigan. 

Levy selected into Society, Biology, & Health cluster

Dorainne Levy has been selected to work as a trainee in the Society, Biology, & Health Cluster at Northwestern University.  This cluster is meant to create an interdisciplinary training environment for graduate students and to foster innovative research on the interface between human biology, society, and health.

Rotella and Craig win NU Graduate Research Grants

Katie Rotella and Maureen Craig have won Graduate Research Grants from the Graduate School at Northwestern University.  These grants are intended to help graduate students offset research costs in historically-underfunded disciplines.

 
Katie Rotella
Maureen Craig

 

 
 

 

Fall 2010

Bean and Rotella win SPSP Travel Awards

Meghan Bean, Katie Rotella, and, Maureen Craig have each won a 2011 Society for Personality and Social Psychology (SPSP) Student Travel Award.

The Travel Award was awarded to 76 students for the purpose of presenting their research at the 2011 SPSP conference. Meghan will receive $500 to support her travel to this year's convention in San Antonio, Texas.

Maureen and Katie will each be presenting their posters, "Coalition or Derogation? How Reminders of Discrimination Influence Intraminority Intergroup Relations" and "Effects of Perceived Victimhood on Intergroup Trust and Loyalty".

Meghan will give a talk entitled "The Threat of Appearing Prejudice: External Motivation to Appear Non-Prejudiced and Race-Based Selective Attention" as part of the Visual Processing of Race Symposium.

 

Eastwick, Apfelbaum, recognized by the Society of Experimental Psychology

This fall, the Society of Experimental Social Psychology (SESP) named the 2010 recipient of their Dissertation award and 2 finalists for the award. This very prestigious award confers membership into the society, which is typically reserved for social psychologists who are at least 5 years post-PhD and who have demonstrated "evidence of substantial contribution to social psychology as an empirical science; significant publication in recognized journals or books."

 

Paul Eastwick (PhD 09) and former SPCL graduate researcher, is the 2010 recipient of the SESP Dissertation Award.  Part of his dissertation is published in Psychological Bulletin, "Beyond the Pleistocene: Using phylogeny and constraint to inform the evolutionary psychology of human mating." Paul is currently an Assistant Professor at Texas A&M.

Evan Apfelbaum (PhD Tufts 09) and current SPCL Post-doctoral Fellow was selected as a finalist for the SESP Dissertation Award for his oustanding dissertation, "Negotiating Diversity: Developmental Emergence, Interpersonal Practice, and Intergroup Implications." He is currently at Northwestern working as a Visiting Assistant Professor of Management and Organizations and Post Doctoral Fellow at the Kellogg Team and Group Research Center.

 

Todd and Pauker receive

2010 SPSSI Dissertation Awards!

Andrew Todd (PhD 09) received the 2010 Social Issues Dissertation Award’s second prize for his disseration, "Combating Contemporary Racial Biases: On the Virtues of Perspective Taking." The award is given by the Society for the Psychological Study of Social Issues (SPSSI) for dissertations that best demonstrate scientific excellence and potential application to social problems. Andrew is now working as a post-doctoral fellow at the Universität zu Köln in Germany.

Kristin Pauker (PhD Tufts 09) received the 2010 SPSSI Social Issues Disseration Award's first prize for her dissertation, "Not So Black and White: The Impact of Motivation on Memory for Racially Ambiguous Faces." Kristin worked with Professor Richeson as an undergrad at Dartmouth College. She is currently a post-doctoral fellow at Stanford University.

The SPCL welcomes two New Members!

The SPCL would like to welcome first year doctoral student Dorainne Levy and Post-Doctoral Fellow Shanette Porter to our research team! This past spring, Dorainne completed her BA in Psychology at Rice University in Texas. She also spent time in our lab for two summers as an SROP fellow.  Shanette Porter received her PhD in Social Psychology from Cornell University. We look forward to working with Dorainne and Shanette!  
 
 

Spring 2010

 

Johnson selected as 2010-2011 APA Executive

Branch Science Fellow

APA’s Science Directorate is pleased to announce its selection of Sarah Johnson, PhD as the incoming 2010-2011 APA Executive Branch Science Fellow. Johnson completed her PhD at Northwestern University and then moved on to do a post-doc at the University of Illinois at Chicago. She will spend her Fellowship year in the Office of Behavioral and Social Sciences Research at the National Institute of Health. She will join APA’s two Congressional Fellows in the year-long Washington, D.C.-based program APA runs under the umbrella of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS).

Craig, Rotella, Rheinschmidt and Sun

receive awards for NSF Proposals

Maureen Craig, a 2nd year graduate student in the SPCL, was awarded a
2010 National Science Foundation (NSF) Graduate Research Fellowship.
NSF selects graduate students based on past accomplishments and future potential for research in STEM disciplines. This fellowship was awarded based on Maureen's past and future research on "Intraminority Relations".

Katie Rotella, a 2nd year graduate student, received an Honorable Mention for her grant proposal entitled, "The social neuroscience of intergroup trust." The National Science Foundation (NSF) bestows this honor upon applicants who have submitted outstanding proposals and recognizes them for making a "significant academic achievement" on a national scale.

Former Lab members, Michelle Rheinschmidt, Deborah Son, and Jason Okonofua also received NSF honors. Michelle, currently a graduate student at UC Berkley, and Deborah, a graduate student at Princeton University, were awarded NSF Graduate Research Fellowships. While Jason, who is now a PhD student at Stanford University, received an Honorable Mention. Jason also earned Honorable Mention in the Ford Foundation Graduate Fellowship Competition.

 

Peery receives ABF Doctoral Fellowship

 

Destiny Peery, a 4th year doctoral student in the SPCL, has won the 2010 - 2011 American Bar Foundation (ABF) Doctoral Fellowship in Law and Social Science. The fellowships are awarded to students conducting research that shows "promise of a major contribution to social scientific understanding of law and legal process."

Destiny aims to direct her disseration work at the question of how psychology and law interact to create, shape, and maintain the social category of race. It is through the lens of multiracialism and the current climate of confusion around how to categorize racially ambiguous or multiracial persons that provides an interesting way to examine this issue.

 
 

Winter 2010

Craig awarded Runner-Up in SPSP

Poster Competion

Maureen Craig, a 2nd year doctoral student in the SPCL, was awarded Runner-Up in the 2010 Student Poster Award Competition at the Society for Personality and Social Psychology (SPSP) conference held in Las Vegas, NV. SPSP gives out three awards each poster session--one First place award and two Runner-Up awards--to students whose poster presentations reflect excellence in research, clarity in presentation, and personal knowledge in a discussion with the judges. Maureen's poster was entitled, "Intraminority relations: Does the salience of historical disadvantage promote common categorization or outgroup derogation?"

 
 

Fall 2009

Johnson accepts Post-Doctoral Position

 

Sarah Johnson has accepted a post-doctoral position at the Institute for Juvenile Research in the Department of Psychiatry at the University of Illinois at Chicago! There, Sarah will join the IMPACT program, under the direction of Dr. Brian Mustanski, where she will work on research examining the clustering of psychological, behavioral, and physical health risks, particularly as they relate to HIV in vulnerable populations.

The SPCL welcomes our new Lab Manager

The Social Perception and Communication Lab warmly welcomes Dawn Espy to our research team!  Dawn comes to us after working as a project coordinator at Cornell University and research assistant at Loyola Chicago. We look forward to working with Dawn!
 
 

Summer 2009

Graduation 2009

The SPCL would like to congratulate lab members Andrew Todd, Paul Eastwick, Sarah Johnson, and David Miele on their successful graduate careers and graduation from Northwestern University.  We also congratulate lab members Rachel Vaughn and Josie Menkin on their undergraduate achievements and graduation. We wish them the best in their future endeavors and thank them for their many contributions to the SPCL!

Sarah Johnson, David Miele, Paul Eastwick, and Andy Todd celebrate with Professor Richeson after their Ph.D. hooding ceremony. Honors students Josie Menkin and Rachel Vaughn enjoy the Psychology Department's graduation festivities with Professor Richeson. 

 

 
 

Spring 2009

 

Todd accepts Post-Doctoral Position

 

Andrew Todd, a graduate researcher in the SPCL, has accepted a post-doctoral position in Cologne, Germany. He will work with Professor Thomas Mussweiler in the Department of Psychology at the University of Cologne. We wish Andy the best with his post-doctoral studies!

 

 

Rotella and Rheinschmidt awarded

Honorable Mention for NSF Proposals

Katie Rotella and Michelle Rheinschmidt, both of the SPCL, were awarded Honorable Mention for their National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship Program proposals. The National Science Foundation (NSF) bestows this honor upon applicants who have submitted outstanding proposals and recognizes them for making a "significant academic achievement" on a national scale.

Katie Rotella, a 1st year graduate student, was given Honorable Mention for her grant proposal entitled, "Intergroup Trust: A Social Neuroscience Approach." Katie is co-advised by Professors Jennifer Richeson and Joan Chiao.

Michelle Rheinschmidt, Lab Manager for the SPCL, was given Honorable Mention for her grant proposal entitled, "Class-based rejection on campus: Implications for low-income students' achievement, well-being, and sense of belonging."

 

Bean wins APA Travel Award

Meghan Bean, a 3rd year doctoral student in the SPCL, has won the 2009 American Psychological Association (APA) Student Travel Award, sponsored by the Science Directorate of the APA. The Travel Award program helps approximately 100 psychology graduate students travel to the annual APA Convention to present their research.  Meghan will receive $300 to support her travel to this year’s convention in Toronto, Canada, which will be held August 6th-9th.

 

Menkin wins Undergraduate Travel Award

Josie Menkin, an honors student in the SPCL, has received the Lois Elizabeth Henrikson Undergraduate Travel Award. These awards, given by the Northwestern Psychology Department, provide funding for undergraduate psychology students traveling to conferences to present their research. Josie will present her senior thesis project at the Stanford Undergraduate Psychology Conference (SUPC) on May 16, 2009. Upon graduation this June, Josie will begin a full-time lab manager position in the Life-span Development Laboratory of Dr. Laura Carstensen at Stanford University.

 

SPCL Members plan Graduate Careers

Jason Okonofua, a former undergraduate researcher in the SPCL, will begin working towards his Ph.D. in Social Psychology at Stanford University this fall.  Under the mentorship of Professor Jennifer Eberhardt, Jason plans to study how stereotyping and prejudice can shape individuals' outcomes (e.g., in education, criminal justice, and the workplace). He hopes to explore characteristics of 'stereotype threat' and investigate the possible effects of subconscious prejudices held by junior high and high school teachers. Jason is currently the Research Study Programs Coordinator for the Psycho-legal Studies Program at Northwestern’s Feinberg School of Medicine.

 

Michelle Rheinschmidt, Lab Manager for the SPCL, will begin working towards her Ph.D. in the Social/Personality Psychology program at UC-Berkeley. She will join the Relationships and Social Cognition Lab (RASCL), led by Professors Rodolfo Mendoza-Denton and Ozlem Ayduk. In her graduate work, she would like to explore how social identities and psychological processes related to inter-group relations (e.g., status-based rejection sensitivity) predict social belonging, mental and physical well-being, and achievement. Michelle is especially interested in studying the college experiences of lower-income students.

 

 
 

Winter 2009

 

Trawalter and Eastwick accept Faculty Positions

 

 

Sophie Trawalter, Ph.D., will be an Assistant Professor at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill beginning this July.  She has accepted a tenure-track faculty position in the Department of Psychology. We wish Sophie well in this next phase of her career!

 

 

Paul Eastwick, Ph.D., will join the faculty of Texas A & M University this summer.  He has accepted a tenure-track position in the Department of Psychology. Paul will be an Assistant Professor beginning July 1st.  We wish him the best in his new position and department!

 
 

Fall 2008

Menkin receives Undergraduate Research Grant

Josie Menkin, an honors student in the SPCL, has received a Northwestern Undergraduate Research Grant (URG). Josie will apply this funding to her thesis project entitled "Ageism v. Racism: An Experimental Examination of Stereotypes about Black Older Adults." Meghan Bean of the SPCL is her graduate student advisor for this project. URG proposals are reviewed by a faculty grant committee. Selected applicants are awarded up to $1,000 in research funding from the Northwestern Office of the Provost.

 

APA recognizes Dr. Richeson with

"Early Career Contribution" Award

 

Professor Richeson has received the 2009 American Psychological Association (APA) Distinguished Scientific Award for Early Career Contribution to Psychology in the area of social psychology. This award, established in 1974, is given to excellent young psychologists who have held their Ph.D. for no more than 9 years. The APA assembles selection panels from 5 areas of psychology each year. Five psychologists receive the annual award, generally one psychologist from each of the areas under consideration. This year's award recipients will be recognized at the August 2009 APA Convention in Toronto, Ontario.

 

Johnson receives APA Dissertation Research Award

Sarah Johnson, a graduate student in the SPCL, has been awarded the 2008 American Psychological Association Dissertation Research Award. Sarah was one of approximately 35 doctoral students in the field of psychology to receive this award.  Recipients receive $1,000 in grant funding to offset the costs of dissertation research. Sarah will apply this funding to her dissertation project, entitled "Middle Class and Marginal? The Influence of Socioeconomic Status on Self-Regulation at an Elite University."

 

The SPCL welcomes two Doctoral Students

The SPCL would like to welcome first year doctoral students Katie Rotella and Maureen Craig to our research team! Katie and Maureen are first year doctoral students in the Social Psychology program. This past spring, Katie completed her BA in Psychology at American University in D.C.  Maureen recently graduated from Purdue University with a BA in Psychology and minors in Sociology and Women's Studies. We look forward to working with Katie and Maureen!    
Katie Rotella
Maureen Craig
 
 

Summer 2008

Graduation 2008

The SPCL would like to congratulate lab members Sara Freedman, Alyse Lattanzi, Jason Okonofua, Deborah Son, and Robynn Yip on their undergraduate achievements and graduation from Northwestern University.  We wish them luck in their future endeavors and thank them for their dedication to the SPCL.

 

 

After completing her senior thesis, Deborah Son, an honors student and longtime member of the SPCL, celebrates with Professor Richeson at the Psychology Department's Reception.  This fall, Deborah will begin a PhD program in Social Psychology at Princeton University.
Professor Richeson and senior Jason Okonofua, a dedicated member of the SPCL for most of his undergraduate career, take a moment to pose before the Psychology Department's Reception.
 
 

Spring 2008

Undergraduate Researchers awarded Funding

for Summer Projects

Dorainne Levy, an undergraduate from Rice University in Houston, Texas, received a Summer Research Opportunities Program (SROP) Fellowship. She was awarded summer funding and a Research Assistant position in the Northwestern's Social Perception and Communication Lab. Her research will include examining the effects of race on perceptions of uniformed authority figures. She will also be analyzing videotaped data examining the relations between non-verbal behavior and blatant vs. subtle racial bias in interracial social interactions. In July, she will present a poster of her research to all of the SROP fellows across the Midwest at a conference at Michigan State University. Dorainne will also deliver an oral presentation of her final research findings to the SROP directors at Northwestern at the end of her summer fellowship.

Allison Mueller, a research assistant in the SPCL, received an Institute for Policy Research Summer Undergraduate Research Assistant Award. She has been awarded funding to conduct research over the summer in order to lay the foundation for her Advanced Independent Research Project for the 2008-2009 academic year. Her summer research will include working with graduate student Meghan Bean to investigate the effects of race on perceptions of uniformed authority figures. Allison will also be analyzing videotaped data related to individuals' social identities and self-presentation strategies.

Rachel Vaughn, a research assistant in the SPCL, has been awarded a Summer Undergraduate Research Grant (URG) by the Northwestern Office of Fellowships.  Summer URG recipients receive funding to offset living and research expenses while working full-time on their scholarly projects.  This summer, Rachel will be leading a project that addresses how different forms of prejudice (i.e., blatant and subtle) may differentially impact individuals from minority backgrounds.  She will also begin preparations for her honors thesis project that she will conduct in the SPCL as part of the Psychology Department's 2008-2009 Honors Program.  

Okonofua recognized for Outstanding

Undergraduate Research

Jason Okonofua, a 2008 Northwestern graduate and longtime SPCL lab member, has been awarded the 2008 “William H. Exum Award” by the department of Sociology at Northwestern University. The department of Sociology designed this award to honor undergraduate students who have demonstrated high quality writing and research analysis in student papers on the topic of race and ethnicity. Jason received this award, which was open to all undergraduates from all disciplines, for his paper entitled “Social Dynamics (Token) Study”. His work includes research on self-regulation in racial-minorities in situations in which they are the sole representative of their race (i.e., a token). Jason’s research aimed to discover whether self-presentation efforts of racial-minorities in these social settings would increase their ability to engage in self-regulation without becoming depleted, compared to Whites. Thus, does the token status serve as training for self-regulation? Jason completed his research with Dr. Jennifer Richeson, and social psychology graduate student Sarah Johnson, during his Summer Research Opportunities Program Fellowship in 2006. Jason has received this honor to recognize his work as demonstrating William H. Exum’s concern with racial problems facing minority youth in higher education, as well as his goals to continue breaking down barriers for all minorities. 

 

Bean Awarded Honorable Mention for NSF Proposal

Meghan Bean was given Honorable Mention by the National Science Foundation (NSF) for her grant proposal entitled, "Young, Black, and Male: Boundaries of the 'Black Male = Threat' Stereotype." The NSF bestows this honor upon applicants who have submitted outstanding proposals and recognizes them for making a "significant academic achievement" on a national scale.

 

Murphy receives Exemplary Dissertation Award

Mary Murphy, Ph.D., has been awarded the 2008 Exemplary Dissertation Award from the Spencer Foundation. The Spencer Foundation designed this award program to provide the research community with examples of outstanding scholarly work by young researchers. Mary was one of five individuals to receive this award and a $2,500 grant. In addition, the Spencer Foundation selects 1-2 recipients of the Exemplary Dissertation Award to receive an additional $25,000 to advance his or her research in education. Mary was awarded a $25,000 research stipend, as well as a complimentary trip to the American Educational Research Award (AERA) Reception.

Murphy (3rd from left) and fellow recipients of the Exemplary Dissertation Award.

 
 

Winter 2008

The APS names Richeson a Rising Star

In the November 2007 issue of the Observer, the Association for Psychological Science (APS) named Jennifer Richeson, Ph.D., a "Rising Star" in the field of psychology. This issue features an interview with Richeson, in which she reflects on the experiences that have drawn her into her current line of research. She acknowledges the mentors and colleagues who have contributed to the accomplishments that she has made in her early career.  Richeson offers advice to graduate students and others just beginning their careers in psychology.

* Download a PDF copy of the article by clicking here.

 

Trawalter receives a Grant Award from the SPSSI

SPCL member Sophie Trawalter, Ph.D., has received a "Grants-in-Aid" Award from the Society for the Psychological Study of Social Issues (SPSSI). SPSSI is an association of psychologists and other scientists devoted to the application of psychological research to important social and policy issues. Sophie will apply this grant funding to her postdoctoral work on how students develop competencies for life in diverse environments.

Kudos to Lattanzi, Son, & Peery!

Alyse Lattanzi and Deborah Son, both senior psychology majors and honors students in the SPCL, have received Undergraduate Research Grant Awards.  These awards, sponsored by Northwestern Provost's Office, provide grant funding to undergraduates conducting independent research projects. 

Alyse will apply this funding to her senior honors project, entitled "Perspective Taking in Interracial Interactions." She will conduct a research study this winter in order to explore this exciting topic. 

Deborah has been awarded this funding to continue work on her thesis project, examining romantic attraction and physiological arousal during interracial interactions.  She began collecting data for this project in the fall and plans to complete this stage of her research study during Winter Quarter.

Destiny Peery, a SPCL member and second year doctoral student in the Social Psychology Program, has received the Society for Personality and Social Psychology (SPSP) Diversity Fund Travel Award.  The SPSP created this fund in order to increase diversity within personality and social psychology. Award recipients are chosen on the basis of intellectual merit. Destiny is one of 12 graduate students who has received funding to attend the SPSP annual conference in February. 

 
 

 

Fall 2007

The Smithsonian Magazine Honors Professor Richeson

 

The Smithsonian Magazine has named Professor Richeson one of America's Young Innovators in the Arts and Sciences. In an October article entitled "The Bias Detective," author David Berreby details Richeson's original and multifaceted approach to studying prejudice and discrimination. Her methods, ranging from computer-based tests of subtle prejudice to fMRI techniques, help us to understand the often unconscious biases that all individuals hold for some social groups over others. As Berreby mentions, "[These] methods allow her to examine the 'they aren't like us' feeling — which can be about gender, age, religion, language, sexual orientation or even obesity." Richeson's work uncovers the challenges that people face in managing their social identities, with an emphasis on ameliorating the social realities of those with stigmatized identities.

* Download a PDF copy of the article by clicking here.

 

The SPCL welcomes a Postdoctoral Fellow

The Social Perception and Communication Lab is pleased to welcome Mary Murphy, Ph.D., to our research team!  Murphy, a National Science Foundation Minority Postdoctoral Scholar, has just begun her fellowship in Northwestern's Psychology Department.  She recently obtained her Ph.D. in Social Psychology from Stanford University, after completing her undergraduate work at the University of Texas at Austin.  We look forward to working with Mary!  

 

 
 

Summer 2007

The SPCL welcomes our new Lab Manager

The Social Perception and Communication Lab warmly welcomes Michelle Rheinschmidt to our research team!  Michelle recently graduated with honors with a major in Psychology from Northwestern.  We look forward to working with Michelle!  

Graduation 2007

 

The SPCL would like to congratulate lab members, Melissa Mitchell, Leslie Halpern, and Christine Peeler on their undergraduate achievements and graduation from Northwestern University.  We wish them the very best and thank them for their contributions to the SPCL.

 

Melissa Mitchell and Leslie Halpern, both honor students in the SPCL, enjoy the graduation festivities and a sense of accomplishment after turning in their theses. Professors Durbin and Richeson celebrate with  senior psychology majors, Jenny Cueto and Melissa Mitchell, at the Psychology Department's Reception.
 
 

Spring 2007

Kudos to Trawalter & Bean!

Sophie Trawalter, a post-doctoral fellow and Ph.D. graduate of the SPCL, has been awarded a fellowship from the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development at the NIH.  She will move to Northwestern's Center on Social Disparities in Health (C2S) to work with Lindsay Chase-Lansdale at the beginning of June, where she will study developmental trajectories of interracial contact anxiety (among other things). We wish Sophie well in her new endeavor and hope to lure her back to the lab as much as possible! 

Meghan Bean, an SPCL Ph.D. student won the 2006-2007 Teaching Assistant of the Year Award from the Psychology Department.  Meghan is being recognized for her outstanding performance as a teaching assistant for the Spring Quarter offering of Psychology 110.  Dr. Engeln-Maddox, the course professor, noted, "It was such a pleasure to work with a TA with such a passion for quality teaching."  Congratulations to Meghan for such a distinguished honor, especially so early in one's graduate career!

 

Undergraduate Researchers receive Awards

Deborah Son, a research assistant in the SPCL, has been awarded the Underwood Fellowship by the Department of Psychology.  She will receive grant funding in order to conduct research over the summer and to lay the groundwork for her honors thesis.  Son will complete her thesis, on romantic attraction and physiological arousal during interracial interactions, as part of the Psychology Department's 2007-2008 Honors Program.    

Melissa Mitchell, an honors student in the SPCL, received the William A. Hunt Award for Undergraduate Research in the Psychology Department.  The Hunt Award is named for Dr. Hunt, a distinguished clinical psychologist and former department chair, and is given to the undergraduate who is judged to have written the best research paper during the academic year.  Mitchell received the award for her thesis, entitled "Been There, Done That: Does Experience Moderate the Depleting Effect of Emotion Suppression?," that she completed as part of the 2006-2007 Honors Program. Melissa is currently pursuing her Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology at Florida State University.

 

 
 

Fall 2006

Professor Richeson named MacArthur Fellow

 

Professor Richeson has been recognized as a 2006 MacArthur Fellow.  Richeson, one of 25 Fellows receiving this honor from the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation in September, will receive a $500,000 "no strings attached" grant award. Fellows chosen by the MacArthur Foundation are recognized for their “creativity, originality and potential to make important contributions in the future.” Richeson, who seeks to better understand and improve intergroup dynamics through her research, was acknowledged by the MacArthur Foundation as a leader in “highlighting and analyzing major challenges facing all races in America and (in) the continuing role played by prejudice and stereotyping in our lives.”

For more information please see the following articles & links:

"Northwestern Faculty Member Named MacArthur Fellow," Northwestern NewsCenter (9,19,06)

"Richeson named MacArthur Fellow," Northwestern Observer Online (9,21,06)

"MacArthur Fellows: 2006 Gallery," The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation.